4.2.7

Poetry and College Composition and Communication

During National Poetry Month, we will be posting poems that originally ran in one of the ten journals published by NCTE. This poem “Syllabus” by Michael True comes from College Composition and Communication:

Syllabus
You will teach me, first, my students,
the character of my indifference,
and the dark confusion of being young;
I will teach you, then, my students,
the hope that lies beneath the surface,
a love inherent in the nature of things.
Follow the course of it to the end of knowing;
gather the thread of it line by line.

Want to read more? Subscribe!

What Challenges Might We Embrace, and How?

This guest post is from James Davis, NCTE’s P12 policy analyst from Iowa. 

These are challenging times for teachers of reading, writing, and the arts of language—but then we’ve faced challenging times throughout our 105 year history. I’ve always prized NCTE for its unity in diversity.

Doug Hesse, in a November 12, 2016, post in NCTE’s Teaching and Learning Forum

My first NCTE Convention occurred in 1968 in Milwaukee, the year that both Martin Luther King Jr and Robert F. Kennedy were assassinated. It was a buttoned down, formal affair (at least the general and business sessions were) but not without intimations, perhaps prescient moments, that alluded to what was going on in the world outside those walls. Beyond the Convention, and only two years after the Dartmouth Conference, we saw the reappearance of Louise Rosenblatt’s Literature as Exploration and publication of James Moffett’s Teaching the Universe of Discourse plus the Squire & Applebee report High School English Instruction Today.

Most significant to me in that moment, as a third-year high school teacher and new department chair, was a preconvention (in those years, Convention started on Thanksgiving Day) study group who explored emerging high school English elective programs. I met Jim Squire, Ed Farrell, and colleagues from several states with whom I would share subsequent Conventions (our network) for years. I returned to Missouri and led our department in creating our own version of an elective program, characterized and introduced by one senior member as “English Needed a Miniskirt.”

We vaguely realized that our early devotion to learner choice would be difficult to sustain, would need to become increasingly nuanced in our classes—not just of them—and even then, in part a response to leverage toward behavioral objectives, was more political than we knew.

Similarly, apart from convention sessions I attended faithfully (my novice sense of responsibility compounded by limited understanding of the convention genre), serendipitous acquisition of a ticket from Ed Farrell sent me to the Marquette University campus one evening for an advance screening of Charley and bonus audience interaction with the star of the film, Cliff Robertson. A déjà vu moment during his Q&A was special; more important was the film’s attention to mental handicaps, not addressed by federal legislation for another seven years. Of course, I thought of my experiences as professional, not political . . .

In 1969, thanks again to the perks provided a department chair, I enjoyed the NCTE Convention in Washington, DC. My preconvention study group in Colonial Williamsburg, VA, offered first-hand exposure to early American literature’s backgrounds—lectures in the morning and tours on our own in the afternoons. Late Wednesday we bused to DC for a quite different NCTE Convention, a “Dreams and Realities” theme, where James Moffett’s address, “Coming on Center,” would rock many of us—the first time, I suspect, I heard a teacher-leader use the phrase military industrial complex!

Immersion in the revolutionary origins and ideals of our country hardly prepared me for Jim’s speech, so compatible with demonstrations by Council members seeking an NCTE resolution against the Vietnam War. NCTE President William Jenkins, who had publicly questioned NCTE becoming a direct political agent in the issue, presided at the business meetings, one of which had to be rescheduled and went into the early morning hours.

New to his role as Executive Secretary (of a Council divided but less diverse than it would become), Bob Hogan struggled to balance consideration for those who abhorred the idea of NCTE taking an overt political position with respectful treatment of those who adamantly, even aggressively expressed opposition to the war and who saw their professional organization as an appropriate agent for change. Ultimately, those assembled passed a resolution in which “the Council officially expresses its abhorrence of the Viet Nam War and its desire to see this divisive conflict ended.”

We were equally unprepared—even by our time at Colonial Williamsburg, though the threads were there—for a powerful CEE luncheon address by Alex Haley. Introduced as a writer for Playboy and of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, “currently working on another book . . .” Haley told the story of his research, of looking for ancestors in property records, and of his journey to Africa, from which he had just returned, to successfully locate his family and tribe.

A silent, awestruck audience followed his tracing through oral history of a few syllables in a native language and at the end gave the most spontaneous and sustained standing ovation of which I have ever been a part. I still ponder what would have occurred if Roots had been published under Haley’s working title, Before This Anger.

I have not thought of NCTE as apolitical since 1969, and in 1970 at the convention in Atlanta, Jenkins said, “NCTE is involved in politics by its very existence.” (Hook, 238) Then (as now?) the question was how and to what extent the Council should purposefully act.

In 1970, President Jim Miller, commenting on continuing confrontations, said they had “jolted organizations out of their smug complacencies and comfortable lethargies,” (Hook, 238) and Council activist Darwin Turner contended, “We must make our voices heard for love and justice, peace and reason.” (Hook, 238)

In the 1970s and since, NCTE has invested in resistance to censorship and of national scapegoating, even then, blaming teachers for educational decline, and of calls for a return to basics. Later, NCTE worked for professional standards, not constraints imposed by business and government.

Recent events pose a need to interpret newly divided constituencies both in and beyond our Council in order to reach students from all families, who are many and diverse.

To navigate this new era we need to engage—what are our common aspirations and how might we resolve differences?

These are the questions we should ask as we look to turn the page.

Hook, J. N. (1979). A long way together. Urbana, IL: NCTE.

Jim Davis began teaching in southwest Missouri as an NCTE and affiliate member, attending his first annual convention in Milwaukee in 1968. Now in his 50th year in our profession, he teaches English education and directs the Iowa Writing Project at the University of Northern Iowa.

Poem in Your Pocket Day 2017

Every April, on Poem in Your Pocket Day, people celebrate by selecting a poem, carrying it with them, and sharing it with others throughout the day at schools, bookstores, libraries, parks, workplaces, and on Twitter using the hashtag #pocketpoem.  –Academy of American Poets

Here are some ideas to help you celebrate Poem in Your Pocket Day on April 27!

 

Still looking for a poem for your pocket? Try this one – with a title perfect for this day!

Who Gets to Speak and Be Heard?

The first rule of free speech is that everyone gets to speak as long as they don’t break the law (like shouting “Fire!” in a crowded theater or slandering someone).

Yet college campuses are at siege right now over this very issue. Take the University of California, Berkeley, which is known as the home of the free speech movement.  But there, on February 1, the planned speech by Milo Yiannopoulos was ended because of riots and violence.  This week Ann Coulter’s April 27 appearance was cancelled, then rescheduled for May 2 when Coulter says she’s unavailable, and now Berkeley being sued, and Coulter is promising to show up on the 27th anyhow.

From an article by Adam Steinbaugh of FIRE (Foundation for Individual Rights in Education):

“As a public university, Berkeley is unquestionably bound to comply with the First Amendment. The university itself doesn’t have to extend an invitation to any speaker in particular, but a public university — an agency of the government — can’t veto who its students invite to speak. Speech is not deprived of protection under the First Amendment simply because is viewed as offensive or hateful…

“But the First Amendment does not permit law enforcement to ban or burden speech on the basis that some people opposed to the speaker might, or are even likely to, react in a violent manner with the intent of stopping the speaker. When it does impose such a burden for that reason, it has established what is known as the “heckler’s veto.” When this is allowed to happen, it provides an incentive for protesters who wish to silence a speaker to act violently, knowing that the police will do the silencing for them. As the Supreme Court held in Forsyth County v. Nationalist Movement (1992), restrictions based on the expected violent opposition to a speaker would work to inhibit the expression of ‘views unpopular with bottle throwers’:

“In a balance between two important interests — free speech on one hand, and the state’s power to maintain the peace on the other — the scale is heavily weighted in favor of the First Amendment. … Maintenance of the peace should not be achieved at the expense of the free speech…”

Can Poetry Help Us To Shape a More Just World?

Can Poetry Help Us To Shape a More Just World?

This is the fourth installment of the NCTE Citizenship Campaign, a blog series sponsored by the NCTE Standing Committee on Citizenship. This month’s theme is using poetry to spark civic engagement. It is written by Duane Davis.

My first instinct as a teacher of English and longtime member of NCTE was to put this month’s theme together through song lyrics.  This would likely have resulted in a deconstruction of the work of Kendrick Lamar, Tupac Shakur, and certainly a mention of Nikki Giovanni’s Poem, “For Tupac.”  I also considered an exploration of poetic justice through the lens of the current political assault on education.

Instead, I decided to ditch both of those ideas and use this space to discuss the work and life of the recently fallen poet, Derek Walcott.  In the proud tradition of “artist on the margins,” Walcott embarked on a journey to create a myth on the level of Beowulf and Virgil, in his epic poem Omeros. I have been fortunate in my life to have English instructors who exposed me to art that challenged my view of the world, my community and myself. In Walcott I found someone who spoke to the ideas that were circulating in my head: global racial formation and its effects on space, language, and identity.  If you don’t know Walcott already, here are some links to explore:

Walcott’s poem is epic and Afro-futuristic and magical realism and intersectional rolled into one.  Ultimately, he reminds us through his work that with art at the center, understanding and acceptance can be the norm and not the outlier. It is not enough to observe and comment on society. You have to enact and activate in order to seek the justice necessary for equity and equality.

As educators, we have to remember that our daily choices, from the greeting at the door (for all levels), to the selection of text, to the type of assessments we give, illuminate our beliefs about the world—who we read, how we interact and what we say.  To that end, I am also including a few links to national poetry organizations that encourage student voice and often through the subject matter explore issues of equality and justice.

While it is not our job to imbue students with our personal ideology, it is our job to give them the tools necessary to critically understand, reflect, respond and evaluate their world and their own ideology.  Poetry is a vehicle for reading and learning the views of others and exploring our own ways of seeing the world.

More Poetry Resources